Antipsychotics

Article

Latuda: An Evaluation of Its Usefulness

With nine other atypical antipsychotics already on the market (some of which are available as generics), did we really need another one? Given the pesky side effects of antipsychotics, maybe we did. Let’s take a look at what we know so far about Latuda (lurasidone) in an effort to figure out how to incorporate it into our clinical toolbox. Latuda was first approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in schizophrenia in late 2010.

Research Update

Should You Be Monitoring Serum Levels of Atypical Antipsychotics in Kids?

For better or worse, we are prescribing atypical antipsychotics more frequently in children. Some of this is due to new FDA indications for kids (autism, psychotic disorders, and bipolar disorder), but much of the increase is driven by off-label use (Tourette’s, ADHD, OCD, depression, conduct disorder and impulse control disorders).

Expert QA

Treating Anxiety in Children and Adolescents

Anxiety disorders, in general, for children and adolescents, can be a very big problem. A big issue is that anxiety disorders are often not the first diagnoses considered and they are often overlooked.

Side Effects of Antipsychotics in Children

Aat a certain point [in my research career], with all the children and adolescents who were being prescribed psychiatric medications, I thought that the adverse effects of antipsychotics in this young patient population were worth examining.

Free Article

The New FDA-Approved EEG Test for ADHD: Should You Order It? [Free Article]

Antipsychotics in Children, CCPR

Over the decades, finding a truly useful objective diagnostic test in psychiatry has proven both elusive and frustrating. 

Originally published in CCPR, December 2014, Vol 5, Issue 8.
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